MC2 Goes to Gettysburg – Day 3

I apologize for the tardiness of this post as when we returned from the field we ate and played cards until bed time.  Here it is!

We woke up to a familiar temperature and smell in the air.  Snow was a’comin.  Surely enough it snowed most of the day with accumulation on the ground but none on the road.

We began with an early visit to Culp’s Hill.  We started with some pictures of Spangler’s Spring.  This spring was visited by thirsty Confederate and Union soldiers.

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We then drove up Culp’s Hill and viewed both the Maryland Union and Confederate Regiments.  As we continued uphill we stopped at the regimental monument for the 137th New York.  It was at this spot on the evening of July 2nd that Colonel David Ireland and his men repulsed a Confederate attack from three sides under cover of night.

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We drove slightly up the hill and got out to find a famous rock that was featured in an illustrating done of the fighting on Culp’s Hill.  Here is a photo of the group investigating the rock.

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We drove up to the Observation Tower on Culp’s Hill and observed the scenery on Benner’s Hill, Cemetery and Seminary Ridges, Oak Ridge, and Big Round Top.

On our way back to the hotel for breakfast we stopped by the Jennie Wade House to pay respect to the only civilian casualty of the battle.  Miss Wade was baking bread for Union troops when a sharpshooters bullet penetrated the door and struck her in the back.  The bullet hole on the door is still evident to this day.

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After breakfast we had an excellent opportunity to have a question and answer session with General Robert E. Lee himself!  Students asked a variety of excellent questions and enjoyed it thoroughly.  The museum itself featured an array of weaponry and historical pieces that General Lee used during the battle.

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After our conversation with General Lee we headed into town to do some shopping.

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I assure you the twins did not return home in one of these…Image

After shopping and lunch we visited Pickett’s Charge.  The snow offered a very different perspective from what the Confederates would have experienced on July 3, 1863 (high 80s and high humidity).

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Colin and Shaun visit the High Water Mark of the Confederacy at the copse of trees (although some say the 11th Mississippi went the furthest!).

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CJ discussed the different between a Light Artillery Battery and a Heavy Artillery Battery.

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After our time visiting Pickett’s Charge Colin planted a New Hampshire flag at the New Hampshire Sharpshooters monument.  The NH Sharpshooters were in support of the Union line repulsing Pickett’s Charge.

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We our focus on the military aspect of the battle completed we shifted our minds to remembering the fallen.  We began by visiting Evergreen Cemetery (which existed during the battle).  While visiting we visited two graves and stumbled on a third historic grave.

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We paid our respects at the Women’s monument to honor those that helped feed, host, or nurse the wounded.  If you look closely there is a shovel featured in this monument.  This serves as a reminder of the tremendous amount of cleanup that was required after this three day battle.

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We paid respects to Mr. John Burns and his wife (see Day 1 section for more information)

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We paid respect to Miss Jennie Wade.

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On our way out of the Cemetery we viewed the grave of Mr. James Gettys (the proprietor of Gettysburg!)

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After our walk through Evergreen Cemetery we visited the National Cemetery to pay our respects to the fallen.

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President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address (the smaller font)

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

Alisha plants a New Hampshire flag at the 1st NH Light Artillery monument located inside the cemetery.

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But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract.

Jake plants a New Hampshire flag at the stone marking the 49 New Hampshire bodies of those who fell at Gettysburg.

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The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain

A row of unknown soldiers from the great state of New Hampshire

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that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Alisha at the Lincoln Monument inside the cemetery which celebrates the address he gave there on November 19th, 1863.

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President Lincoln stares at Shaun

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Shaun stands at the National Soldiers and Sailors monument which was built supposedly where the platform was that Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address.

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Kimberlee found Sergeant Humiston’s grave in the New York section (See Day 1 for more info).  President Nixon and General Patton both have relatives buried at the cemetery.

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After we finished paying our respects at the cemetery we headed towards the square so Alexia could fulfill her trip long goal of getting a photograph with President Lincoln.

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We were supposed to go have a fancy supper but due to the time of the year (so cold and some restaurants weren’t open) and folks not feeling well we decided to get some pizzas as a group and play cards.  Jake was the official first champion of the Gettysburg Garbage (the name of the card game!) tournament.

The next morning Jay and I woke up to head to the Pennsylvania monument for one last farewell.

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So long Gettysburg.  Until next time, and there will be a next time.

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On our way home we saw the NYC city skyline (a first for some students).  Look at the size of that new World Trade Center!

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